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A Process for Making Generative Art

I like to make images that fall somewhere between collage, generative art, and algorithmic art. My generative artistic process usually begins with either a photograph I have made, or an image from the public domain. Some favorite places to search for public domain images incude Flickr Commons, the vast collection of public domain images from the Metropolitan Museum of art, and also the Walters Art Gallery.

A Collection of Image from Flickr’s “The Commons.”

I then begin a collaborative process between me, my device (in this case a 12.9 inch iPad Pro), and series of Photo-editing apps.

After the images are arranged or combined in Procreate, I start generating new images, often with an app called decim8. I sometimes use an app called PicsArt for interesting filters, and then I go back to Procreate for further layering and collaging. I also use Brushstroke, which uses algorithmic filters to make an image look painterly.

The iterations of the generative art process

Is it purely algorithmic? Yes, because I always feed an image into decim8, which uses algorithmically generated filters. No, because I produce numerous iterations, and it takes my human eye to determine what is aesthetically pleasing. To take it to the next level, It would be interesting to use an app like decim8 and train it to randomly produce something that is aesthetically pleasing.

Cow Skull with Roses Digital Print

This artwork is called “Cow Skull with Roses.” A dark and moody cow skull with layers of gorgeous roses floating behind it. This bohemian digital art print will bring out the cowboy or cowgirl in you. You can buy it here.

Please note: This is a digital file for sale. No actual print will be delivered. It is a downloadable file for you to print however you like. This high resolution artwork can be printed as large as 18 by 24 inches. By purchasing the digital file, you can have many different options for printing. Costco does very affordable large scale printing. iPrintfromhome is another option if you would like a giclee print to frame, or stretched on a canvas. You could also use it with Vistaprint to make note cards. It can be used as many times as you like.

Developing a Print Store Business Model, part 2

It felt like a busy and productive week. But the important question is, how did I do on last weeks tasks?

Take some simple shots of of frames against some neutral backgrounds to test out the feasibility of making my own mock-ups.

I took a handful of these photos. This may be a feasible option, but it will be an afternoon’s work, possibly with setting up some shots in different parts of the house to get the some natural light. When I use actual frames it seems to be difficult to get the frame straight enough. Also, I need to brush up on my clipping masks in Photoshop Elements so I can streamline the process a bit. Here are my results:

 

Purchase a frame mockup from Creative Market, to see what how easy it is to work with.

I bought this one for $5 and it actually works fine with Photoshop Elements. It is super simple to use. You can also change the frame and wall color so at $5 it was totally worth it. Here are some of my results:

 

Identify 50(!) works that I can add to Etsy as digital files.

I think I knew this would be an unrealistic number as soon as I chose it. I did however, identify 20 images, and I am still seeing a lot of limitations as far as resolution. I seem to do a lot of digital sketching and playing around without considering the end result. There’s nothing wrong with this, it’s part of my artistic process. But it has left me with lots of sketches and not enough finished work. Moving forward I am going to have to start creating at a minimum of 4800 by 6000 pixels. That would result in a file that could produce a 16 by 20 inch print at the best resolution (300 dpi.)

In addition to working on my goals I came up with these Chrysanthemum images that I know I can use, but not sure where:

 

I created them with the Amaziograph app and colorized them in Procreate. They could be used as procreate stamps, graphics, art prints, etc. Either way, it was very enjoyable working on them and I’d like to do a whole series. I have a feeling they are going to lead to something else.

Tasks for this week:
I am scaling it down this week; identifying 50 images was completely unrealistic. This time I’ll finish 10, combine them with the frame mockups, and post to Etsy.

I will develop more procreate brushes and start building a library of painted backgrounds for procreate. When I do eventually put together the procreate brushes, I would like to offer textured, painted backgrounds to go with them.

These two things will keep me very busy but I’m also going to add one more thing. As a graphic design project I am going to make a chart of popular print sizes in inches, matched with the proper pixel resolution for printing. I think it will be useful to have it posted in my work area so I can be always be reminded of the optimal end result: something that looks good in print!

 

Developing a Print Store Business Model

Yesterday I tried to print something for a customer (yay! an actual customer!), because he was unhappy with the results of the print on demand site I was using. Using my Epson R2000 was beyond frustrating, as usual. The print kept coming out too dark and muddy looking. When I finally found a fix for this, a new problem arose and the print had “banding” on it. I ended up wasting a couple hours of my time, and lots of expensive ink and paper. Because this is the research phase of developing my print store business model, I think I have to rule out 2 things: Using my Epson R2000 for high quality prints, and using Printful.com to sell prints on demand. Read more